There is no holiday more focused on killing the members of a single species than Thanksgiving. Each November, more than 45 million turkeys end up onMark_meets_the_turkeys dinner plates in the US. Turkeys raised and killed for food are drugged to grow so large inside windowless factory farms that they are crippled by their own weight; indeed, they can no longer even reproduce naturally. Moreover, to prevent the birds from harming one another in the confined spaces of a factory farm, farmers clip their upper beaks in a painful procedure that makes it difficult for the turkeys to eat.

Fortunately, more and more people are giving thanks by making compassion the centerpiece of their table and opting for a cruelty-free holiday. From Tofurky Feasts and Field Roast products to a bounty of delicious plant-based recipes found in an ever-growing selection of vegan cookbooks, there’s no need to kill anyone this Thanksgiving.

Photo by Jo-Anne McArthur/Farm Sanctuary

Photo by Jo-Anne McArthur/Farm Sanctuary

One activity that has become especially popular is to visit a sanctuary for farmed animals and feed the turkeys. These so-called “ThanksLiving” events give us the opportunity to interact with these remarkable animals and treat them to pumpkin pie, cornbread, cranberries, and other goodies. I’ll never forget the first time I got to meet turkeys at Animal Place; they are so gentle and curious and enjoy being talked to and petted. Check out this excellent sanctuary guide from Vegan.com to find an event near you. (Tip: If you’re an animal activist, visiting or volunteering at an animal sanctuary and connecting with the animals is incredibly important.)

And if, like me, you love cooking up a feast, visit some of these sites for easy recipes and information on vegan eating:

ChooseVeg.com

ExploreVeg.org

FoodIsPower.org

GetVegucated.com

GoVeg.com

OhSheGlows.com

Post Punk Kitchen

Vegan.com

VeganMexicanFood.com

So enjoy a delicious, vegan Thanksgiving. After all, holidays are about family and friends—not death.